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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
president. he's got romney's arms tied in the same way that the religion right has his arms tied on abortion rights, same-sex, the way the neo cons have his arms tied in terms of foreign policy. >> one question either the moderate or obama should ask, name one issue in which you plan to puck your party, one issue in which you plan to stand up to house republicans, one issue in which you don't plan to govern as a severe conservative as you described your record in massachusetts before you were describing your record as a bipartisan bridge builder. >> would he come out with a sister souljah moment on request? >> that could request. were you a severe conservative or are you the reaching over the aisle -- across the aisle kind of guy? which is it? but you've got to -- as i said before, you have to go at romney the person. it's not romney's policies because those don't really exist. it's romney the man that he's -- >> i agree. that's what i'm working tonight. let's take a look at the promise romney made at the debate last week about keeping his $5 trillion tax cut deficit -- new deficit neutral.
-- and this is almost inevitable, we don't talk religion in this country, we're not comfortable with it, we're a country of tremendous religious diversity and increasingly so, and we don't think it should be in any way used as a test, but what do you think is relevant to the world view of mitt romney in his faith? >> i think there's something sort of fundamental and carefully crafted by mitt's responses to questions about his faith. i think he feels it very deeply, but can't really talk about it. there's sort of a hidden he fee but can't talk about it. he keeps it close and i think it's altered the way he approaches conversations not just about his faith but about many other things people would like to know about it. >> all religions have, if you don't mind it, their weirdnesses, whether it's exorcism in my religion. every religion has different things. it didn't really add up to history. so what is it that he doesn't want to bring out that might be seen as relevant by voters. >> it's not so much as what's seen by voter, but the way i look at the religion with mitt was that i wanted to know what does fa
is the congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or the free exercise and stay out of it and leave people alone when it comes to their religion obviously assumes the religion. they believe in god. so i'm not going to revise history to pretend that. i grew up in a religious environment and i am proud of it. i was into the priest. i'm proud of that. i would probably enormously angry right now. so i am grateful for my faith and on and on apologetic about it. >> this is pretty remarkable we started talking a little bit about how it has changed over time. we could have also added to the 19th amendment and women becoming a part of this part of the democratic inclusion. [laughter] but most of the amendments have made it more perfect. they got rid of it. >> ausley understand. >> it is pretty extraordinary. the constitution frees up every american to be eligible for public office, and there is no religious test and that wasn't the prominent feature of the state constitutions. a lot of them actually had religious tests. >> you have the establishment in religion. so, on a unde
our religion. interesting new research on faith in america. >>> the potential health benefits for a diet rich in tomatoes. >>> and a carcinogen has been seeping under the south bay for decades. the investigation is up next. measures... measure up. money to our schools. "misleading." out here. it. but there's hope. straight to our schools... keeps it there. politicians. yes on thirty-eight. >>> well, there's no question about it. it's an eye opening discovery. it's nona rural forgotten area. >> and investigation has uncovered higher than expected cancer rates among residents in a specific part of mountain view. steven stock began digging into the story and now a lot of people are asking some serious questions. >> reporter: that's right, we asked california's cancer registry to see if there were more reported cases of cancer than scientists would normally expect among the population living there. those results are now back. and they show a higher incidence of certain types of cancer. a group known by scientists as nonhodgkin lymphoma. >> here's the report. >> oh, my goodness. >>
was hit by a minimum minimum -- minivan tied. it happened as children were leaving a religion class. >> two mothers were victims. they were lying dish saw them lying one on the grass and one on the pavement, and then the -- i saw the seven-year-old kid, she was in shock. >> the last time he saw she child, she was breathing. she died here at san francisco general hospital, where the other two female victims were brought. one of the women is the mother of the six-year-old. what brought the tragedy closer to the reyes family is their child knew the little girl. >> the girl under the van, it was my son's classmate. reporter: paisher ins were shocked and saddened be the accident. the female driver of the minivan mistook the accelerator for the brake pad and struck the victims. there were prayers at the afternoon mass. >> they all went to catechism here. very sad. the whole family is involved. everybody involved. >> the driver was still on scene when the officers arrived and has not been arrested. reporter: police have not released the conditions of the two female victims except to say th
leaving a religion class. >> two mothers were victims. they were lying dish saw them lying one on the grass and one on the pavement, and then the -- i saw the seven-year-old kid, she was in shock. >> the last time he saw she child, she was breathing. she died here at san francisco general hospital, where the other two female victims were brought. one of the women is the mother of the six-year-old. what brought the tragedy closer to the reyes family is their child knew the little girl. >> the girl under the van, it was my son's classmate. reporter: paisher ins were shocked and saddened be the accident. the female driver of the minivan mistook the accelerator for the brake pad and struck the victims. there were prayers at the afternoon mass. >> they all went to catechism here. very sad. the whole family is involved. everybody involved. >> the driver was still on scene when the officers arrived and has not been arrested. reporter: police have not released the conditions of the two female victims except to say they're in their 40s and the gent is still under investigation. >> ama:
civilization was this? what religion drove them to do this? we keep doing the same things over and over again. many researchers believe these archeo-astronomical sites are very specifically designed where other researchers say it's all coincidence. but not long ago i was up at a place called chimney rock in southwest colorado. and it's over 8,000 feet. and you are up at the southern end ftd rocky mountains and there is this scarp of rock that rises up probably about a thousand feet out of a valley floor and right at the tip of this scarp there are two twin towers of rock. if you get to a certain place on top of this very narrow butte, you can see between these twin towers and there happens to be a great house built between these two towers and every 18.6 years when the moon goes into its northernmost point on the horizon, it rises between those two towers. i was there at the beginning of the last 18.6 year cycle and we stood up there, probably 20 of us, researchers, forest service people, all gathered at the same spot with cameras and huddled -- it was late december at 8,000 feet and we were
connected still. so, religion is very much a part of our everyday lives, and in our communities and who we are as people but we still have persecution for our religious practices. you mentioned that in the book. one of the phone calls we get is those people incarcerated for prison our military limited in their ability to practice religion. what are those challenges? >> guest: i think it is a real issue. the first kind of disclaimer to cut out there for people is there's so much diversity in indian country and the traditions even for example for red lake reservation in minnesota one of the villages has never had a church or a mission, 100% traditional beliefs, kunin practice they bury their dead in the front yard it changes things. you step out the door and there's bad, brand mauney and grandpa. doesn't make it hard to sell the family farm and go to california so that connection to place is really deep and a lot of native people. on the same reservation, across the lake at the village of red lake there is a catholic mission in the church. the population is predominantly catholic those are t
values in regard to the family, to religion. >> abortion. >> abortion. issues on that. >> gay marriage. they're very conservative. that's basically what changed everything. i remember reading an article where president bush was asked what was one of his biggest regrets. he said, not passing immigration reform. as a republican and having a republican congress he could not convince his own party to support immigration reform. we focus only on the undocumented immigrants. i think that that's -- that that's what's happening, that when people perceive latinos, first thing that pops into their mind is immigrants and undocumented immigrants or like they say illegal aliens which is a term we don't like to use. they don't realize that 74% are americans, are citizens either by birth or naturalized. so the majority of latinos are americans and we have a buying power of over a trillion dollars. if latinos in the u.s. were a country, we would be the 14th largest economy in the world. they're 2.5 billion businesses that are latino owned. we are a very important part of this country. we contribute ve
as having no religion vote mostly for democrats and support abortion rights and gay marriage. losing weight clicked for me when i had everything i needed to lose weight right in my hands. sophomore year started weight watchers online, the weight started coming off. ahh! oh my gosh! [ laughs ] we're college kids, we go out all the time. having my food tracker on my phone, i can figure out what i'm having at the restaurant. i lost 73 pounds with weight watchers online. i don't think i've ever smiled this much in my whole life. it kind of hurts my cheeks. [ female announcer ] join for free. hurry, offer ends october 20th. weight watchers online. finally, losing weight clicks. i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios in-wash scent boosters, here with my favorite new intern, jimmy. mmm! fresh! and it's been in the closet for 12 weeks! unbelievable! unstopables! follow jimmy on downy.com for free samples >>> breaking news right now.
. not ideology or religion. it is driven by desperation. yemen's live in $60 economies. in a region that is cut off from the rest of the world, where people are living on less than 800 calories a day, that makes a difference. it is a real concern about government corruption that is pulling people into the insurgency in yemen. not drone strikes, not jihad, not ideology. all of those things are used. the second thing i found in yemen, they resent the drone strikes. they have the image of the drones and the u.s. government is standing up a government that is not accountable to them. we hear this over and over. in the south and in the north. this notion that the u.s. is propping up a government that is not responsive to the population. it is fundamentally undermining our political objectives, even while securing our security objectives. neither one of them bears any resemblance to the facts on the ground. they are distorting our ability to understand the relationship between the instruments of policy and the actual substance of our objectives. our security terms and our long-term political objectiv
, what i did find is that the recruiting is not driven by the u.s. truck strike, ideology or religion, that even a driven by a notion of clothes and hot. in a region that is cut off from the west of the world were people living on less than 800 calories a day that makes a real difference. economic deprivation and a real concern about government corruption is pulling people into the insurgency, not u.s. throws strikes or global ideology. all of those things are subsequently used as the indoctrination process. subsequently used to legitimize and mobilize and prepare their message to the broader world. that's not what is actually bringing 18, 19, 200 kids. the second thing is overwhelmingly they resent the does tracks. they resent the draws tracks of the national sovereignty grounds to national pride grounds, but they also resent them because they have the image that the drones and that the u.s. government is standing up a government that is not accountable to them. we hear this over and over. it did not matter what i was talking to. this notion that the u.s. is propping up a government
african-americans, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere and, above all, um, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution, um, was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda. who were two of the best and brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 197 finish -- in 1985 in a memo plotting litigation strategy at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote: what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v. wade? later that year applying for a promotion he wrote: i am particularly proud of my contributions to recent cases in which the government has argued in the supreme court that the constitution does not protect the right to an abortion. samuel alito then, samuel alito now. but the republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either, and we saw that in re began's nominations to the -- reagan's nominations to the supreme court. 1981, pott
that republicans attack women is so offensive to me and the way they talk about religion is offensive as well. some people don't like to hear celebrities talk about politics. i don't think i'm a celebrity, i'm a working actress. >> oh god. spare me that line. >> and it's looking more and more likely that the smaller cheaper ipad is coming this fall. apple has placed an initial order of 10 million tablets being dubbed as the ipad mini. the current ipad has a 9 inch screen, while the competing kindle and nook have 7-inch screens. >> the phones are getting bigger, and the ipads are getting bigger. >> i wouldn't want a smaller screen. >> the only benefit would be cost. because presumably you could buy one for cheaper. >> bill: no. >> i'm with you. >> bill: steve jobs would not like it either. >> i think you might be right. >> bill: all right. yes, indeed look the news of the day we have already had calls and emails about it. obama supporters are panic over the latest pew poll. the poll this morning shows that among likely voters since last week's debate mitt romney has soared
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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